A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday at about 10:45 local time (8:45 GMT). 

The eclipse will be fully visible in the Faroe Islands, 200 miles (321 miles) off the coast of Scotland, and in the Svalbard archipelago off the coast of Norway.

In Turkey, and in Europe, it may be partially visible. It won't be visible at all in the U.S.

A solar eclipse happens when there is new moon. The moon on Friday will be at the closest point in its orbit to the earth, making it appear larger on earth than usual. The moon passes between the sun and the earth, blocking out all the sunlight.

It is dangerous to look directly at a solar eclipse, as blindness can result.

For the latest eclipse, hundreds of astronomers are already stationed at Svalbard, Norway. Solar eclipses provide a unique opportunity to study the sun’s atmosphere – the corona – which is much easier to observe with most of the sun’s light blotted out.

There is no risk of solar power failure, as engineers are aware of the eclipse, and will compensate from other sources.

Another full eclipse of this type will not occur again until 2026.

Anadolu Agency